Print terms and definitions can be confusing or obscure.

  Winter dried Fireweed leaves and grass scanned and blended with a  wood surface texture and material layers.     By Mid to late July in the Yukon,  Fireweed begins to flower creating blazing pockets of fuchsia color across field edges, and shed and house siding. By fall, the standing dead plants are amazing sculptural testaments to the brief speed of summer growth.

Winter dried Fireweed leaves and grass scanned and blended with a  wood surface texture and material layers.

By Mid to late July in the Yukon,  Fireweed begins to flower creating blazing pockets of fuchsia color across field edges, and shed and house siding. By fall, the standing dead plants are amazing sculptural testaments to the brief speed of summer growth.

What is an archival pigment print?

Pigment inks are highly stable inks used with professional inkjet printers.

In combination with carefully chosen archival papers and surfaces plus framing under glass, care with lighting and wall placement, prints using these inks are considered museum standard, archival and rated up to 200 years (According to testing done by Wilhelm Imaging Research) will add link

I refer to the prints I have available for purchase as archival pigment prints because I happen to feel it is an unambiguous description of the medium.

An archival pigment print and a Giclée print are the same!

Giclée was coined in the 1980’s to distinguish between standard desktop inkjet prints and new, groundbreaking large format prints from professional printers using higher quality inks.

Technology, ink jet printing, and printers have advanced so much since then that I feel the term is now archaic and lends itself to confusion and misuse. I highly recommend reading Giclée; your time is up! Link here, http://jacklowestudio.co.uk/blog/giclee-your-time-is-up/ by British photographer and master fine art printer Jack Lowe.

What is an original digital photographic print?

Digital art evolves within the technology boundaries of computers and multiple software programs, drawn from as wide a range of source material as an artist chooses. Digital camera photography bridges the world of physical camera work by creating files easily transferred to a computer, where they can be explored through software to take creative vision further than the camera allows.

Within a digital environment,  photographic imagery is original artwork. The artist or photographer created the work to be a digital file.

  • An original digital print, unlike an original physical painting, is not one of a kind, in that the image can be printed multiple times from a file.

Each printing of digital artwork, photographic image onto paper and other mediums becomes an original print because the artist intends to take the image further creatively through a choice of printing media. Every change of paper thickness, texture, media surface response to color, tone and even final print size can create a unique print, with a very different emotional feel.

Mark Graver, an award-winning artist/print-maker, curator, and tutor, has written very about original print versus reproduction under the paragraph heading Digital Printmaking vs. Traditional Techniques, on his website page. http://www.markgraver.com/digital-prints/, its well worth a read.

Some print terms and definitions can be confusing or obscure.

Over the years I've pondered how to think through some of these terms and found in some cases a simple definition seems the better choice when describing a process.

 

What the heck is Fine Art?

It’s a term often used to distinguish artwork that is expressive, emotional and deeply embedded with an artists personal creative process and vision.

Fine art photography is a term that lacks a specific definition but is used in general to categorize or define photographic work that does not fit comfortably within the realms of commercial, design or fashion photography.

The work is personal and part of a photographer's emotional response to an image or subject.

Then there's Digital photography!

I use a digital camera, flatbed scanner and computer software as my tools.

All digital and technology based.

When working on other printing projects, I I do use a baby etching press with dreams of being a Ferrari.

 A paint can sitting by the window in my studio.

A paint can sitting by the window in my studio.